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Ottawa City Council will look very different after Monday’s vote.

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Citizens will elect a new mayor and a host of new councillors, including 10 from wards where incumbents have chosen not to run again, and one from the newly created ward of Barrhaven East. Fascinating races are taking shape in every corner of the city.

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Polls are open until 8 p.m. If you need more information on how to vote, check out our FAQ: How and where to vote in the 2022 municipal elections in Ottawa


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  1. Bob Chiarelli, Catherine McKenney and Mark Sutcliffe are all candidates for mayor of Ottawa in the 2022 municipal elections.

    ‘Good for Democracy’: Ottawa’s Most Exciting Mayoral Race in Over a Decade Approaches the Finish Line

  2. Ottawa City Council voted 21 to 2 last year to adopt an official plan to guide the city's development over the next quarter century.  But he's still awaiting provincial approval, which means the next city council may have to grapple with what comes next.

    Still awaiting approval, Ottawa’s official plan is under scrutiny by the province — and mayoral candidates

Election Day Photo Gallery

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Mayoral candidate Catherine McKenney leaves the Factory Recreation Center after casting her vote on Election Day.  October 24, 2022. ERROL MCGIHON/Postmedia
Mayoral candidate Catherine McKenney leaves the Factory Recreation Center after casting her vote on Election Day. October 24, 2022. ERROL MCGIHON/Postmedia Photo by Errol McGihon /Postmedia
Mark Sutcliffe and his wife, Ginny, vote in the municipal elections, October 24, 2022.
Mark Sutcliffe and his wife, Ginny, vote in the municipal elections, October 24, 2022. Photo by Jean Levac /Postmedia
Line up for the municipal election at St George's School polling station in Ottawa, October 24, 2022.
Line up for the municipal election at St George’s School polling station in Ottawa, October 24, 2022. Photo by Jean Levac /Postmedia

Mayoral candidates

Profile: Don’t count Bob Chiarelli yet in Ottawa’s municipal vote; he always played the long game

By Joanne Laucius

Mayoral candidate Bob Chiarelli says the dysfunction at City Hall and his own background prompted him to enter the race.
Mayoral candidate Bob Chiarelli says the dysfunction at City Hall and his own background prompted him to enter the race. Photo by Julie Olivier /Postmedia

Bob Chiarelli remembers having a conversation with himself before deciding to announce his candidacy for mayor.

“I participated in 11 elections. I won nine and lost two, Chiarelli said in an interview at his campaign headquarters in a second-floor office on Carling Avenue.
“You can win and you can lose. But if you’re not ready to lose, don’t run. And work like hell to win.

If that statement sounds familiar, you need only go back to 2018, when Chiarelli lost his second election, finishing third in the battle for the provincial riding of Ottawa West-Nepean. Read the full profile here

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Running Man: Politics, Marathons and Mark Sutcliffe’s Luck

By Andrew Duffy

Neat, compact and still boyish at 54, Mark Sutcliffe sits in a Wellington Street cafe, shoulders pressed forward as if leaning over a studio microphone: it’s second nature after three decades as a television host and radio host.

Over the course of his career, Sutcliffe has interviewed hundreds of politicians, but he no longer holds the microphone.

He walked through the political mirror in the glare of a murderous mayoral contest, and he’s still adjusting to this alternate universe where he’s the one answering questions, not asking them. He also learns to manage a message. Read the full profile here

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Why Catherine McKenney Keeps Running: The Make-Up of the Progressive Candidate for Ottawa Mayor

By Jacquie Miller

At the “Freedom Convoy” protest last winter, Ottawa Councilor Catherine McKenney joined a council meeting live from the busy downtown.

While most advisers appeared on the video call from home – a regular practice during the pandemic – McKenney instead wore an N95 mask as he strolled through the city’s downtown area, where jerrycans were stacked alongside of trucks adorned with Canadian flags.

“The stench of diesel fumes right now is actually sickening,” McKenney reported.

“We’ll never leave,” shouted a man in a toque as he walked past McKenney.

“Hi,” McKenney replied, wasting no time. Read the full profile here

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Beyond the Big Three, Ottawa mayoral candidates struggle to be heard

By Jacquie Miller

Some of Ottawa's mayoral candidates, top row from left: Mike Maguire, Nour Kadri, Bernard Couchman;  Middle row from left: Celine Debassige, Jacob Solomon, Ade Olumide, bottom row from left: Graham MacDonald, Param Singh, Brandon Bay.  Not pictured, Gregory Guevara.
Some of Ottawa’s mayoral candidates, top row from left: Mike Maguire, Nour Kadri, Bernard Couchman; Middle row from left: Celine Debassige, Jacob Solomon, Ade Olumide, bottom row from left: Graham MacDonald, Param Singh, Brandon Bay. Not pictured, Gregory Guevara. POSTMEDIA

Ottawa voters will have a long list to choose from when they vote for a new mayor on Oct. 24 and for candidates without name recognition of the three perceived favorites, being heard above the din has been a challenge.

“I know it’s a crowded campaign, but I don’t think the media is evaluating candidates through a good lens,” said Nour KadriUniversity of Ottawa professor and businessman who describes himself as a “coalition builder” with a talent for innovation and problem solving.

“(The media) made a big mistake by ignoring Trump as the leader of the Republican Party in the United States. In a crowded campaign of 14, he said. “No one took him seriously and when he came out on top a lot of people regretted it.”

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Even Naheed Nenshi, who served as mayor of Calgary for 11 years, polled just one percent at the start of his first campaign in 2010, Noor said.

“Everyone thought he was a long shot, but people felt differently.” Read the full story here


Districts


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